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20121002
20121010
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the economy and one each onro healthcare, the role ofan government and governing. with an emphasis throughout onc differences specifics, and choices. both candidates will also have two minute closing statements. s promised to remain silent. no cheers, applause, boos, hisses, among other noisy, distracting things, so we may all concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception right now, though, as we welcome president obama... and governor romney. [cheers and applause] >> reporter: gentlemen, welcome to you both. >> gentlemen, welcome to you both. let's start the economy, seth one and let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you you go about creating new jobs?w you have two minutes. each have two minutes to start. a coin toss has determined, mr. president, you go first. >> thank you very much, jim, yu for this opportunity. i want to thank governor romnek and university of denver for your are hospitality. there are lot of points i wantr to make tonight but the most important one is that 20 years ago i became the luckiest ma
was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. neil: i want you to look at this crux of people in spin alley as they call it, and i'll chat shortly, a very astute observation that there's more romney people in that throng than there are obama people, and i think she's right. i'm looking at that. that doesn't necessarily mean anything, but if you want to get your people out in force, and you feel good about the job you think your guy did, then it's no trouble for you even to leave the debate early, as many did, rudy juliani was here before the thing finished. the president had his surrogates out there as well. this is a fascinating what i call a right of passage in politickings -- politics and debate history. you watch a debate, how should i feel? di
was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. she's "time's" assistant managing editor. rana, i wonder what you thought about the two candidates as they talked about the economy. how did their plans measure up against each other? >> i think the key issue is taxes and i think you have to wonder whether romney's math adds up. i think we're still left really wondering about a lot of details, about how this plan is going to garner the revenue he's talking about. i think we still don't know what sort of loopholes are going to be closed. and whether or not the math can be made to work without opening up contentious loopholes like the mortgage interest deduction. but i think there's a biggest math issue here and that's whether or not lowering tax rates creates jobs
with health-care inflation, this would cost the average senior about $16,000 per year, but governor romney has said is he will maintain traditional medicare alongside it. there is still a problem. those insurance companies are clever about figuring out who are the younger and healthier seniors. they recruit them, leaving the older, sicker seniors in medicare. every health-care economist as said overtime, the traditional medicare system will collapse. you have people, like my grandmother, at the mercy of the private insurance system when they are most in need of decent health care. i do not think vouchers are the right way to go. this is not only my opinion. aarp thinks the savings we obtained from medicare bolstered the system, lengthened the medicare trust fund by eight years. benefits were not affected. if you repeal obamacare, those seniors will pay $600 more in prescriptions. there will have to pay co-pays. the primary beneficiary of that repeal our insurance companies that are estimated to gain billions of dollars back when they are not making seniors healthier. that is not the right appr
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)